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Thursday, July 21, 2016

Rugged Knits Pattern Highlight: Sun Flare

This week's Rugged Knits pattern highlight is a fun one for summer! Sun Flare is a triangle kerchief with a subtle, intuitive, and fun textured pattern that's created with just knits and purls.


CONSTRUCTION
- Worked bottom-up, starting with just a few stitches for the tip of the triangle.
- Simple garter stitch borders the sides and top of the triangle

- The fabric lays flat because of the textured stitch pattern.
- Wrong side rows are easy - just knit the first and last few stitches for a garter edge and purl the rest!

FIT
- The triangle has a wingspan of 41 in/104 cm, so it's more of a shawlette than a shawl. I wear it kerchief-style with the point in the front and the fabric tied in the back

YARN
Swans Island Natural Colors Fingering (100% certified organic merino wool; 525 yd 480 m/100 g)
- A light fingering weight plied yarn with a fairly tight twist gives great stitch definition.
- I love how the semi-solid color gives the stitch pattern the subtle look of an antique tapestry. (You could use a more solid color for clearer texture if you prefer.)

- Soft Merino makes it wonderful to work with and perfect for wearing right next to the skin.

TIPS FOR SUBSTITUTING
- I used almost the entire skein for the sample, and Natural Colors Fingering comes with more yardage than is common in sock yarns - 525 yd/480 m). For more standard 400 yd sock yarn skeins, you'll need two skeins.
- If you want stitch definition, choose a yarn without a halo (so avoid alpaca and mohair).

- A solid-colored yarn with silk content like Quince and Co. Tern could make the texture bolder.
- For an affordable warm-weather option, consider Knit Picks Comfy Fingering Yarn.

MY FAVORITE DETAIL
The texture is so fun to work and adds such a great subtle look.

GENERAL TIPS
Don't be daunted by all the charts! They're there to help you maintain the edge pattern, but the center of the pattern is intuitive and doesn't change throughout.

Be sure to use the hashtags #RuggedKnits #Sunflare, and #AndreaRangelKnits when you post pics of your Sun Flare projects!

UPCOMING EVENTS
Come to my book launch events and take my intro to color work class using the Boreal Toque pattern!

Tolt Yarn and Wool, Carnation, WA - July 30, 2016
Boreal Toque Workshop 10am-2pm
Book Launch Party & Signing 3-5pm

Beehive Wool Shop, Victoria, BC - August 6-7, 2016
Book Launch Party & Signing, August 6, 11am-3pm
Boreal Toque Workshop, August 7, 1-4pm

PATTERN DETAILS


Finished Size
About 41 in/104 cm wide and 19.75 in/50 cm long.

Yarn 

541 yd (495 m) fingering weight (#1 Super Fine).

Shown here: Swans Island Natural Colors Fingering (100% certified organic merino wool; 525 yd 480 m/100 g): color #YF124 Bittersweet, 1 skein (sample shown uses almost an entire skein; to ensure sufficient amount of yarn for swatching, you may consider purchasing a second skein).

Needles 

Size U.S. 2 (2.75 mm): 40” (100 cm) circular (cir). 
Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions
Size C-2 (2.75 mm) crochet hook; markers (m); tapestry needle; blocking wires.

Gauge
28 sts and 48 rows = 4 in/10 cm over Textured Stitch pattern.

See it on Ravelry

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Rugged Knits Pattern Highlight: Lilac Sky

Now that Rugged Knits is out in the world, I've been highlighting each one of the patterns so you can get a closer look at what makes them special. I've covered a couple sweaters and my Boreal Toque so far, and this week, I'm going to share Lilac Sky, a simple but stunning loop scarf.



CONSTRUCTION
- Worked in the round - no seams and very little finishing required!
- The wide borders on top and bottom are a variation of the center stitch pattern.

FIT
- The loop has a circumference of 44.5 in/113 cm and it's 16 in/40.5 cm deep, so it's long enough to double it up in chilly weather, but it looks beautiful and elegant just tossed on.

YARN
Malabrigo Lace is such a unique yarn. (100% merino wool, 470 yd 430 m/50 g)
- It's a very lightweight singles, but it's spun tightly so there's no danger of it coming apart while you work.
- It creates a fabric that has an extremely cohesive, velvety feel that's so light it floats and drapes at the same time.
- Because the yarn is so soft and delicate (and partly due to the singles construction), the finished fabric can tend to fuzz and pill, but scarves don't receive much abrasion, so I don't find this to be a problem. And I just love the fabric so much that I can't bring myself to be bothered much by that.

TIPS FOR SUBSTITUTING
- If you choose a plied yarn, keep in mind that it will probably create a fabric that's less cohesive, though it might also be less likely to pill.
- To maintain the clarity of the textured stitch pattern, avoid yarns with fibres like alpaca or mohair that have a lot of texture or halo. If you like that softer, more muted look, though, an alpaca blend lace weight could have a gorgeous drape.
- To transform this into a summer essential, work it up in Anzula Breeze. (65% Silk, 35% Linen; 750 yd/686 m per 114g skein)
- For a made-in-the-USA option, try Quince and Co. Piper (50% Texas super kid mohair, 50% Texas superfine merino; 305 yd/279 m per 50g skein) or Brooklyn Tweed Plains (100% Rambouillet; 440 yd/402 m per 50g skein)


MY FAVORITE DETAIL
The surprisingly soft and light textured fabric.

GENERAL TIPS
The row gauge in the textured drop stitch pattern is very dense, so this isn't a quick project, but it's very easy to memorize making it great for knit night or traveling. Also, did you notice the affordable price of Malabrigo Lace? You can make this scarf for under $30!

Be sure to use the hashtags #RuggedKnits #Lilacsky, and #AndreaRangelKnits when you post pics of your Lilac Sky projects!

UPCOMING EVENTS
Come to my book launch events and take my intro to color work class using the Boreal Toque pattern!

Tolt Yarn and Wool, Carnation, WA - July 30, 2016
Boreal Toque Workshop 10am-2pm
Book Launch Party & Signing 3-5pm

Beehive Wool Shop, Victoria, BC - August 6-7, 2016
Book Launch Party & Signing, August 6, 11am-3pm
Boreal Toque Workshop, August 7, 1-4pm

PATTERN DETAILS


Finished Size
About 44.5 in (113 cm) in circumference and 16 in (40.5 cm) long

Yarn
1344 yd (1229 m) laceweight (#0 Lace).

Shown here: Malabrigo Lace (100% merino wool, 470 yd 430 m/50 g): color #52 Paris Night, 3 skeins.

Needles
Size U.S. 3 (3.25 mm): 40” (100 cm) circular (cir).
Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions
Markers (m); tapestry needle.

Gauge
24.5 sts and 79 rnds = 4 in (10 cm) over Dropped St Stockinette pattern

See it on Ravelry

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Rugged Knits Pattern Highlight: Boreal Toque

I've been writing about the patterns in my new book Rugged Knits - previously I covered two sweaters, Hazy Cloud and Silhouette Baselayer. Today I'm going to get into one of the accessory patterns, Boreal Toque. Like the Silhouette Baselayer I envisioned Boreal Toque working equally well for men and women.


CONSTRUCTION
- Bottom-up
- Simple wide ribbed brim
- Easy to follow color pattern without any long floats - no float catching is necessary!

FIT
- Intended to be worn with a snug, beanie-style fit so it's comfortable under a helmet.
- For a slouchier fit, work more Stockinette after completing the color pattern and before beginning crown shaping.

YARN
I used one of my favorite yarns, Brooklyn Tweed Loft (100% Targhee-Columbia wool; 275 yd 251 m/50 g).
- Woolen spun construction makes a light, warm hat. Color work adds warmth and wind-resistance with very little added bulk.
- The tweedy color palette is gorgeous and extensive. There are so many girly, masculine, and neutral color combinations to choose from!
- Brooklyn Tweed Yarns are made in the USA. I love supporting North American yarn production!

Tips for Substituting
- Lots of yarns can work for this one. Fibres like alpaca, silk, and cotton may stretch out of shape over time, so wool may be best. But, that's not nearly as big of a concern as it would be with a garment.
- For a bright, saturated project, I'd love to see this worked up in your favorite hand dyed sock yarn like Hazel Knits Artisan Sock.
- For a natural, un-dyed look, try Bare Naked Wool Better Breakfast Fingering.
- If you like clean, smooth color work, I recommend Quince and Co. Finch.

MY FAVORITE DETAIL
The color pattern that's dramatic, but not difficult to work.

GENERAL TIPS
Color dominance is important for this project. Because the contrast color creates the pattern, I held it dominant for this hat. Like I mentioned in the post about Hazy Cloud, I love this article by Dianna Walla about color dominance in knitting.

Be sure to use the hashtags #RuggedKnits #Borealtoque, and #AndreaRangelKnits when you post pics of your Boreal Toque projects!

UPCOMING EVENTS

Come to my book launch events and take my intro to color work class using the Boreal Toque pattern!

Tolt Yarn and Wool, Carnation, WA - July 30, 2016

Boreal Toque Workshop 10am-2pm
Book Launch Party & Signing 3-5pm

Beehive Wool Shop, Victoria, BC - August 6-7, 2016

Book Launch Party & Signing, August 6, 11am-3pm
Boreal Toque Workshop, August 7, 1-4pm


PATTERN DETAILS


Finished Size 
About 201⁄4 (21, 22)” (51.5 53.5, 56 cm) head circumference and 71⁄2 (73⁄4, 81⁄4)” (19 19.5, 21 cm) long.

Example A shown on woman in size 21” (53.5 cm). 

Example B shown on man in size 22” (56 cm).

Yarn 
Sock weight (#1 Super Fine). Main Color (MC): 119 (128, 137) m. Contrast Color (CC): 36 (46, 55) m.

Shown here: Brooklyn Tweed Loft (100% Targhee-Columbia wool; 275 yd 251 m/50 g): colors for Example A: Old World (MC), 1 skein; Snowbound (CC), 1 skein; colors for Example B: Pumpernickel (MC), 1 skein; Hayloft (CC), 1 skein.


Needles 
Size U.S. 3 (3.25 mm): 16” (40 cm) circular (cir) and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (dpn). 
Size U.S. 5 (3.75) mm 16” (40 cm) circular (cir). 
Adjust needle sizes if necessary to obtain the correct gauges.

Notions 
Markers (m); tapestry needle.

Gauge 
25 sts and 36 sts = 4” (10 cm) over St st using smaller needle. 
25 sts and 31 sts = 4” (10 cm) over color chart using larger needle.




       Get Rugged Knits from Interweave

Friday, July 1, 2016

Rugged Knits Pattern Highlight: Silhouette Baselayer


This is the second post in a series highlighting the patterns in my book Rugged Knits. (You can read about the cover sweater, Hazy Cloud, here.) Today I'm going to delve deep into the Silhouette Baselayer patterns. I designed versions for men and women because I think this can really work well for everyone! 



Photo Credit: Interweave/F+W 2016


CONSTRUCTION
- Seamless, worked in the round to the neckline
- Bottom-up
- Underarms are joined with Kitchener Stitch.
- Yoke shaping is carefully calculated so that armhole and body shaping are accomplished at different rates. This creates a good fit around the shoulders. 
- Gentle waist shaping gives a feminine silhouette in the women's version, while the men's version includes reverse A-line shaping, a deeper yoke, and longer sleeves to better suit a man's proportions.

FIT
- Intended to be worn with a fairly snug fit (1-3 inches/2.5-7.5 cm of positive ease)
- For a snug fit similar to your favorite thermal shirt, choose a size close to your chest circumference. This could also be worn as a more relaxed pullover with a bit more ease. I don't recommend making it with more than 4 inches/10 cm of positive ease, though, because the fabric is very lightweight and isn't designed to be worn very oversized. The shoulders may look sloppy if worn with more positive ease than that.

YARN
I chose Anzula Cloud (80% superwash merino wool, 10% cashmere, 10% nylon; 575 yd 526 m/114 g) because:
- It's next-to-skin soft
- It's spun fairly loosely, which makes it a light, lofty yarn
- The colors are dreamy! There are so many options for both men and women.

That loose spin and super soft fibres could contribute to a seamless sweater stretching if it was worked in plain Stockinette, but the textured stitch pattern helps give structure to the fabric, so it'll last a long time. 

Tips for Substituting
- Cloud is a light fingering weight yarn. When substituting, be sure to choose one that's also fairly light. If you choose a heavier fingering weight yarn, you're likely to have a denser sweater with less drape. This could be a good adaptation, though, if what you're looking for is a warmer sweater.
- As I recommended for the last sweater, I'll say again: Work at least one large swatch in the round (and be sure to block your swatch!) in order to help you decide on which yarn you'd like to use. This is of course also necessary for checking your gauge. 


MY FAVORITE DETAIL
The simple but unusual stitch pattern gives the impression of the classic thermal shirt waffle texture in a hand knitted garment.

GENERAL TIPS
The textured stitch pattern isn't difficult to work, but if you're not familiar with it, I recommend using a light color so you can see what's going on with the pattern a little more clearly.

Be sure to use the hashtags #RuggedKnits #SilhouetteBaselayer, and #AndreaRangelKnits when you post pics of your Silhouette Baselayer projects!

PATTERN DETAILS

WOMEN'S VERSION
Finished Size 
32 (35.5, 39, 44.25, 47.75, 51.25)” (81.5 (90, 99, 112.5, 121.5, 130) cm bust circumference, and 25 (25.5, 26, 27.5, 28.75, 29)” (63.5 65, 66, 70, 73, 73.5 cm) length. 
Intended to be worn with 1–3”(2.5–7.5 cm) of positive ease

Shown in size 35.5” (90 cm)

MEN'S VERSION
Finished Size
36 (39.5, 44.75, 48.25, 51.75, 55.25)” (91.5 100.5, 113.5, 122.5, 131.5, 140.5 cm) chest circumference and 26.25 (26.75, 27.25, 28.5, 29.5, 30.25)” (66.5 68, 69, 72.5, 75, 77 cm) length

Intended to be worn with 1–3” (2.5–7.5 cm) of positive ease 
Shown in size 44.75” (113.5 cm)

Yarn 
Sportweight (#2 Fine) yarn in 2 colors: 
Main Color (MC): 734 (823, 924, 1013, 1,114, 1203) yd (671 752, 845, 926, 1018, 1100 m). 
Contrast Color (CC): 651 (730, 820, 898, 988, 1087) yd (595 667, 750, 821, 903, 994 m).

1168 (1303, 1429, 1618, 1744, 1879) yd (1068 1191, 1307, 1479, 1595, 1718 m) fingering weight (#1 Super Fine) yarn. 

Shown here: Anzula Cloud (80% superwash merino wool, 10% cashmere, 10% nylon; 575 yd 526 m/114 g): color Avocado, 3 (3, 3, 3, 4, 4) skeins.

Needles 
Size U.S. 3 (3.25 mm) 16” and 32” (40 and 80 cm) circular (cir) and set of 4 or 5 double- pointed (dpn). 
Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions 
Stitch markers (m); stitch holders or waste yarn; tapestry needle

Gauge 
271⁄2 sts and 38 rows = 4” (10 cm) over Tiny Bow Knot pattern

See it on Ravelry




       Get Rugged Knits from Interweave

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Rugged Knits Pattern Highlight: Hazy Cloud



When I envisioned Rugged Knits as a collection, I wanted to create a cohesive group of designs that would be classic and beautiful while also having an outdoorsy, active vibe. 

Over the next few months I'm going to highlight the designs in my book Rugged Knits, looking deeply at each one to give you a good view of the details I designed in, what to consider when making your own, and what makes it work for the long term. 

First up I'm going to take on Hazy Cloud, the cover sweater. I describe this one as the ultimate sweatshirt because the fit is relaxed and comfortable and the yarn I chose, Fibre Company Road to China Light, is unbelievably soft with gorgeous drape. The overall effect is a luxury version of your favorite lounge wear.




CONSTRUCTION
- Seamless (never work color pattern on the wrong side)
- Bottom-up
- Neckline is created with steek stitches that are reinforced and then cut. Because the yarn is a bit slippery, more steek stitches are used than is standard. The neck band is then picked up and worked double, then sewn down so that the cut stitches are entirely enclosed.
- Underarms are finished with 3-needle bind-off.
- Yoke shaping is carefully calculated so that armhole and body shaping are accomplished at different rates. This creates elegant, flattering raglan/saddle shoulder lines. 
- Gentle waist shaping gives a feminine silhouette.

FIT
- Intended to be worn with a relaxed fit (4-6 inches/10-15 cm of positive ease)
- To get the comfy sweatshirt look, go up a size when in doubt. If you like a more fitted silhouette, you could also try it with less ease. Check the measurements of a sweater you love and compare them to the schematic if you're having trouble deciding.

YARN
I chose Fibre Company Road to China Light (65% baby alpaca, 15% silk, 10% camel, 10% cashmere; 159 yd [145 m]/50 g) for a bunch of characteristics:
- softness
- elegant drape
- slight shine
- subtly heathered colors
- warmth

Fibres like alpaca and silk have a strong tendency to grow out of shape, but the checked color pattern worked at a snug gauge creates a fabric that is dense but flowing. That all-over color work gives a great level of resilience to the fabric that makes a long-lasting garment.

Tips for Substituting
- You're likely to have a stiffer sweater with wool. If you choose a yarn that's 100% wool, you may want to work with a fingering weight instead of a sport in order to get pattern gauge while maintaining some of the drape given by RTCL. 
- To get a sweater more like the sample, choose a yarn that includes some of the fibres in RTCL like alpaca and silk.
- Work at least one large swatch in the round (and be sure to block your swatch!) in order to help you decide on which yarn you'd like to use. This is of course also necessary for checking your gauge.
- I'd love to see this sweater worked with Spincycle Yarns Dyed in the Wool as the Contrast color. I haven't swatched it, but I have a feeling that it would look incredible with the long color changes paired with a solid.

MY FAVORITE DETAIL
The wide but shallow V-neckline is just the perfect shape, and the encased neckband gives a pro finish.

GENERAL TIPS
Be sure to hold the same color dominant throughout this project as the fabric will show it pretty clearly if you switch dominance while you work. The easiest way to do this is to hold the yarns with one color in each hand and pick with your left hand while throwing with your right - hold the dominant color in your left hand and and the non-dominant one in your right. I love this article by Dianna Walla about color dominance in knitting.

Be sure to use the hashtags #RuggedKnits #HazyCloudSweater, and #AndreaRangelKnits when you post pics of your Hazy Cloud projects!

PATTERN DETAILS
Finished Size 
33 (36.75, 40.75, 44.5, 48.5, 52.25)” (84 93.5, 103.5, 113, 123, 132.5 cm) bust circumference and 26 (26.75, 27.75, 28.25, 29, 29.25)” (66 68, 70.5, 72.5, 73.5, 74.5 cm) long.

Intended to be worn with 4–6” (10–15 cm) of positive ease. 
Shown in size 36.75” (93.5 cm).

Yarn 
Sportweight (#2 Fine) yarn in 2 colors: 
Main Color (MC): 734 (823, 924, 1013, 1,114, 1203) yd (671 752, 845, 926, 1018, 1100 m). 
Contrast Color (CC): 651 (730, 820, 898, 988, 1087) yd (595 667, 750, 821, 903, 994 m).

Shown here: The Fibre Company Road to China Light (65% baby alpaca, 15% silk, 10% camel, 10% cashmere; 159 yd 145 m/50 g): colors Lapis (MC), 5 (6, 6, 7, 7, 8) skeins; Riverstone (CC), 5 (5, 6, 6, 7, 7) skeins.

Needles 
Size U.S. 2 (2.75 mm) 24” and 32” (60 and 80 cm) circular (cir) and set of 4 or 5 double- pointed (dpn). 
Size U.S. 5 (3.75 mm) 32” (80 cm) circular (cir) and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (dpn). 
Adjust needle sizes if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions 
Markers (m); stitch holders or waste yarn; tapestry needle; small amount of fingering- weight yarn in coordinating color for steek reinforcing; size C-2 (2.25 mm) crochet hook for steek reinforcing.

Gauge 
31 sts and 28 rnds = 4” (10 cm) over Checked Color patt using larger needles.





       Get Rugged Knits from Interweave

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Sounds of Life Cardigan


Let me introduce Sounds of Life, a new cardigan pattern with a great relaxed fit, generous pockets, and a standup collar. I chose a very special yarn for this one and I'd love to share my discovery with you!

I discovered Cestari Traditional 2 Ply while I was visiting Tolt last year. It was a yarn I’d never noticed before, though it isn’t new. When I picked it up I was immediately intrigued by its unique feel - soft and buttery, but very woolly and rustic at the same time. I could feel and smell the lanolin still in it and once I cast on, I was delighted to discover the occasional bit of straw as I worked. It wasn’t constant or anything, but each little speck was a sweet reminder of the life the sheep who had grown that wool might have lived. In researching Cestari further, I found a delightful sentiment on their website about this very experience. Company owner, Francis Chester was quoted as saying, “If you put his yarn to your ears, you can almost hear the sounds of life within it.” I couldn’t resist naming the sweater Sounds of Life after that wonderful quote.



I had been throwing around the idea of a good, solid workhorse of a cardigan, something versatile and wearable with a stand-up collar and functional pockets - the perfect PNW sweater, in other words - and when I discovered this yarn, the idea solidified.

I was originally a bit skeptical about the marled colors, even though I was also really drawn to them. I worried that the finished fabric would end up muddy or ugly. I was so wrong about that, though. The fabric is tweedy and interesting and beautiful in all the best ways. Several of my testers used Cestari for their sweaters too, a couple of them in the black/white marled colorway, and I’m now a complete convert to marled yarn. I even got myself another sweater’s worth of the marled black/light gray the last time I was at Tolt - stay tuned for more on that!

I've worn the sample quite a lot - it was hard for me to put it in the mail and let the folks at Tolt borrow it! At first glance, this sweater might seem somewhat plain, but here are a few of the special details that I really love:

Rolled edgings bordering the ribbing gives a relaxed exposed-seams look while staying nice and neat

Subtle waist shaping, carefully-designed set-in sleeves, and short row shoulder shaping makes a great fit. The intended fit is generous enough to wear over your wool base layer or plaid button-up, while keeping a flattering look. I made mine (the 34 in/86.5 cm size) with three inches of positive ease, and I recommend choosing a size that’s about 2-4 in/ 5-10 cm larger than your bust circumference.

The pockets! The openings are angled to make them particularly useful, both for hand-warming and keeping things in, and the size is generous. These pockets are definitely not just for decoration!

The stand-up collar adds extra versatility - if you need a bit of extra warmth, button it up all the way, or fold it down if you’re warming up a bit. Working the cardigan in a fairly stiff yarn like the Cestari Traditional 2-ply in the sample or Istex Lettelopi is most likely to give you that stand-up collar look. A softer yarn can be a wonderful choice, but be aware that your collar might lay a bit more flatly on your neck if you pick something with more drape.

Construction: Get the best of both the seamed and seamless worlds! The body is worked in one piece seamlessly with the shoulders joined with 3-needle bind-off, and the sleeves are worked in the round to the sleeve caps. Then the caps are worked back and forth in rows and then they’re sewn in using Mattress stitch. The beauty of this construction is that it minimizes seams where they’re less necessary for resisting stretching - along the sides of the body and insides of the sleeves - and puts seams where they’re most helpful for keeping your sweater in shape for years to come - at the armholes and shoulders.

The gauge - I worked this sweater at 16 sts/ 24 rows = 4 in/10 cm, making the whole thing a really quick knit



If you haven’t tried Cestari and you’re into rustic wools, I really recommend giving it a shot. It’s really affordable too - just nine or ten dollars for a 170 yd skein! But just in case you can’t get your hands on Cestari or want to go stash diving, some other yarns I recommend are:


Because the gauge is 16 sts = 4 in/10 cm, be sure to get a yarn that’s a heavy worsted or aran weight. Lighter worsted weight yarns like Brooklyn Tweed Shelter could work, but are more likely to pill and stretch at such a loose gauge. Be sure to swatch with your desired yarn choice (and block your swatch!) to check that you’re happy with the fabric you get at that gauge.

The sample is in the mail winging its way to Tolt Yarn and Wool right now, so you'll be able to see it and try it on there soon, and Tolt carries Cestari, so you can pick up yarn for your project while you're there. You'll also be able to get the printed pattern at Tolt soon, or ask your local yarn shop to order it from my distributor, Stitch Sprouts. You can also buy it as a pdf download on Ravelry and on my website

If you like my designs and enjoy getting pretty knitting pictures in your inbox, subscribe to my weekly email newsletter! Happy knitting!



PATTERN SPECS
Sizes and Finished Measurements 
Bust Circumference: 34 (38, 42, 46, 50, 54, 58) in/86.5 (96.5, 106.5, 117, 127, 137, 147.5) cm

Intended to be worn with +2-4 in/5-10 cm of ease at bust for standard fit; shown in size 34 in/86.5 cm with +3 in/7.5 cm of ease on model.

Yarn 
970 (1096, 1214, 1333, 1451, 1570, 1688) yd/887 (1002, 1110, 1219, 1327, 1436, 1544) m heavy worsted weight yarn

Shown in Cestari Traditional Wool 2 Ply 
Color: Light Gray/Medium Gray Marled; 6 (7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 10) skeins

Blocked Gauge 
Gauge measurement should be taken after blocking. 
16 sts/24 rows = 4 in/10 cm in Stockinette stitch using Needle B or Needle D (suggested size US #8/5 mm)

Needles & Notions 
Needle Sizes are recommendations only. Always use needle size necessary to obtain gauge.

32 in/80 cm circular needles: 
Needle A: US #6/4 mm 
Needle B: US #8/5 mm 

Set double pointed needles, long circular for magic loop method, or two circular needles (preferred small-circumference circular knitting method) 
Needle C: US #6/4 mm needle 
Needle D: US #8/5 mm needle

stitch markers 
tapestry needle 
five .75 in/2 cm buttons 
needle and thread

Skills 

working in the round, increasing and decreasing, picking up stitches, seaming, including setting in sleeve caps

Sounds of Life pattern pdf download 
$8


Saturday, December 26, 2015

Knitscene Spring 2016

Knitscene Spring 2016 is here and I'm particularly excited for this issue because I've got four new patterns in it! 

Photo Credit: Knitscene/Goodfolk Photography

I'm delighted to be this season's featured designer and I used the opportunity to create a collection of patterns focused on the theme of movement. You can read about my design concept in the lovely profile that Karen Templer wrote after interviewing me. 

THE DESIGNS

Siula Grande sweater is my perfect spring sweater. It's soft, light, draping, and has a relaxed, feminine fit. I worked it up in Malabrigo Lace, so it's almost featherweight. The sweater is mostly worked in ribbing, but I added some sweet little lace details at the hem, cuffs, and along the lines of the raglan shaping. The wide scoop neckline is finished with a clean and simple rolled hem. 

Photo Credit: Knitscene/Goodfolk Photography

Mismi Shawl uses contrasting colors of soft gray to create a bold and versatile piece. It's an asymmetrical triangle worked from the wide side to a point. It involves a little Intarsia to join those two colors, but if you haven't done it before, this would be a great introduction. There's really nothing to it - just twist the yarns around each other and go on your way. The lace is clean and geometric and I can't get over the incredible stitch definition I got from the Quince & Co. Tern I used in my sample. 

Photo Credit: Knitscene/Goodfolk Photography
The Chachani Hat uses the same little lace pattern I employed in the Siula Grande sweater, but it's doubled to keep your ears warm. The spiral twisted stitch pattern moves gracefully around the body of the hat and meets up at the crown in a lovely, organic way. I knit mine up in Swans Island Natural Colors Merino Fingering, which is a fairly light fingering weight yarn. I love the soft, supple fabric it gives, and there's something special about working with indigo dyed yarn. (It turned my hands blue, but I kind of love that!)

Photo Credit: Knitscene/Goodfolk Photography
And the Salcantay Cowl uses the simplicity of a big garter chevron and stripes to make a graphic but understated accessory. I know this will be a go-to piece in my wardrobe when I get the sample back. (Yes, I've been wearing my samples! Once they've done the rounds, I can't seem to let them sit in storage because I want to wear them too much!) Hikoo Rylie is an alpaca/silk/linen blend and it makes such a great fabric! It has a gorgeous drape, as would be expected, and it's soft with a tiny bit of halo and a tiny bit of crunchiness from the linen. 

Photo Credit: Knitscene/Goodfolk Photography
I hope you like the collection! You can get the digital edition now from Interweave, and the print magazine will be in your LYS and local newsstand soon. You can also learn more about the other patterns in the issue on the Knitscene blog.

Happy Knitting!

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